17 Responses

  1. Tanya Flynn

    I love these older homes, especially the Queen Anne style homes, they are my favorite. I am always so sad when I see older homes that are dilapidated and falling to the ground, and wonder how beautiful they must have been back in their glory days, with a full mixed family hustling and bustling to help each other with their daily living. I also always wondered why they had such big houses and when I got older and found out that it was because they had several generations of family living under the same roof. And I guess that it took the whole family to make any type of decent living and have a decent life. Where as of today, most homes are single family homes with the siblings and each generation going there separate ways, but with hard economic times, once single family homes on their own are finding it difficult to support themselves and they are moving back in with other family members. I find that these larger family homes should act as a reminder of how far as a society we have came and that we should appreciate there glory that they represent. One day when I’m fully self sufficient and able to I am going to buy an older Queen Anne style home that is in need of being saved and remodel it, keeping in style of course, and giving it all the modern day necessities needed so that me and my family will be comfortable and I can have the satisfaction of knowing that I did my part in preserving a piece of our cultural history.

  2. Chelsea Patrick

    I was one of the students from the Interior Design program at Eastern Florida State College that helped to promote the saving of this historical structure, Green Gables. I’m aware that it is in even deeper danger of being demolished since we were on site a few months ago. This honestly makes me very sad. This Queen Anne home was absolutely gorgeous, and oneAs an Interior Design student, the importance of historical preservation strikes a deep chord with me, and has since before I was a student. My parents were always antique collectors and appreciated history in all aspects, including architecture. They passed this appreciation onto me. I currently live in one of the oldest structures in Rockledge, FL. I agree with this article on such a great level. I too, believe that the value of preserving historical structures lies also with preserving the history of the community in which they are located. Growth cannot happen without understanding where we came from, what our past consists of. To better know the people that we have been, we can become a better people for the future of our generation and generations to come. It is imperative that the community as a whole, and society in general, educate themselves on the history of where they live! The buildings that stood long before even their grandparents were born. Who wouldn’t want to know that? I find it so interesting! I truly feel like the more people are educated with the history of their surroundings and the structures that stood, the more apt they will be to stand up when action is needed against demolition. I feel very strongly about this topic and I enjoyed this article immensely!

  3. Brittany Loper

    As you stated so eloquently, buildings create the character of our communities. Historic preservation, with regard to America specifically, should be of the utmost importance. America, as a country, is quite young, and it is also very delicate in terms of the potential loss of historic structures and as evident in your post, the fully executed loss of historic structures. America seems consumed with the concept of forward advancement. It is seemingly easier to demolish historic structures to make room for the latest and greatest in architecture, technology, etc., while completely losing our history in terms of architecture.

    We are no Egypt in terms of historically significant structures, but we do have excessive structures to take great care of and be proud of. As time moves on, if individuals do not state or create a cause for concern about the love and significant attributed to aged buildings, what will become of them? I for one am upset and sickened to see empty strip malls where newer strip malls are built across the street, but I digress.

    There is definitely a certain magic, as you say, or even wonder that is associated with buildings from a different time. Spreading the love and magic of historic preservation is important to our young but significant history. This Place Matters is a lovely representation of the passion and desire for these buildings to remain preserved and loved.

  4. Justin Champion

    Each city in each state has a history of how it began and how the city faired over the years and throughout history. Over time the city morphs into what we know it as and so many times we forget where we came from. This is sad because our children will never be able to experience the past and the history of our cities without the preservation of what’s left of it.
    The house at green gables has so much history behind the structure as well as history in the architecture and the design and location of the building that we will lose a great piece of Melbourne if this structure is destroyed. With the Ice house across the street and the burger inn up the street, this area has really been preserved by the past. Its really sad that the organization has to fight so hard to keep and preserve these beautiful and important structures.

  5. Sandra Fox

    This article really spoke to me. If we are to embrace our past history we cannot continue to tear down historic homes and buildings. It is through these very buildings that future generations will be able to see and possibly walk through and gets a better sense of what like was like “back when”. The one positive, if at all there is a positive demolition is that of Miguel’s Restaurant in 2002. At least the outrage of taking such a substantial landmark, run down or not lead to the formation of the Melbourne Historic Preservation Board in 2003. Once these magnificent structures are taken to the ground it is virtually impossible to replicate the time period through exact construction. As stated in the article, if these homes and buildings could be preserved could it lead to the restoration of the area around it as well? I believe that people have grown tired of the bright and shiny cookie cutter homes and long for a return of a simpler, more neighbor friendly way of life. It has occurred to me that I have not seen any new homes with front porches; I mean real sit down and visit awhile type of front porches. Why is that? The older historic homes all have those types of porches. Perhaps if these homes would be saved, preserved we could go back to having people sit out on their front porches instead of hiding in their homes behind a computer screen for hours upon hours. I believe that the restoration will not only astetically enhance the community but will also lead to a renewed sense of pride within the community.
    Word count: 275

  6. Jeanne Diehl-Shaffer

    It is great to see the information in this article as well as the students getting involved in preservation.

  7. Eddie Browder

    Melbourne’s historic buildings distinguish her from any other city in the world. Like an individual finger print or DNA, no two cities have the same founders, structures and public places. It is paramount to save Green Gables but not just for the structure itself! I love how the author shows that these historic structures often serve as key gateways into historic areas. Together with neighboring historic structures, they also create the critical mass needed to tell “the bigger picture ” and create a true sense of place. Thank you for an informative and inspiring article!

  8. Danielle Elkins

    I love how no matter where you live, if you look hard enough history can be found. Florida, and especially Brevard County are full of an abundance of old historic buildings and structures. There truly is so much history here in our community, and it is promising that there are people and groups that are passionate about making an effort to try and save these historic structures from being torn down. I never go to see Miguels, but it looks like it was a very neat building that could have been turned into something rather than demolished. There are so many shopping plazas and strip malls now in our landscape, that an old building full of history and character can really bring something special to an area. I don’t see any reason why most of these old structures cannot be fixed up and repurposed. Riverview Village is a really neat neighborhood that has so much character. New builds and new development has its place, but there really is something important and soulful about an old building, or an old neighborhood that brings a sense of belonging to a community, It is important for people and communities to see that people came before them, that they are a continuation of something else, and historic structures like the ones highlighted in this article are a great reminder of that, and should be taken care of and left to remain in the community.

  9. amna murshed

    I enjoyed reading your post very much. I always loved and always was interested in history; especially discovering the significance history of a place, what happened, why is this place still special, and the most fun part of it is reliving the moment of that specific period of time.
    Ever since I have moved to Florida with my family three years ago, I have always been on the outlook to discover the many treasures of this amazing historic place.
    As Goldberger said “it is important to save good examples of certain architectural styles”. I totally agree with what was said; not every building is worth saving. Moreover, not every building represents an area, or it doesn’t fit with its surrounding structures or buildings.
    On the other hand, I personally don’t think that demolishing the old vernacular houses in the area is a great move, unless the houses are not stable or they are Deteriorating. That is because these houses were one of the first to be built in the area, and most importantly the architectural styles of these houses and buildings speak for a significant period of the progression of the local area.
    It sad that in some cases that historic houses and buildings are being neglected; the Green Gables house in Melbourne on U.S 1 is truly a beautiful and unique house that is sadly being neglected. I was one of the many students of (EFSC) to hold up the “this place matters” sign in front of the Green Gables house.

  10. Shanna Lake

    I agree, whether old or new, historic building create the community. It tells a story of the town. Buildings are the eye of town, peoples first instinct are to look at the buildings. It is what catches peoples attention and draws them in. I also agree that some places are not always worth saving. It is all about business and image. If it is a unpopulated town that people do not visit or it is just run down, people may feel that it is not necessary putting money into recreating a historic building if they think that they will not gain profits from it. There are places like Riverside Village that may not be visible just by driving through but still holds alot of history and values. There are many people who loves the shady and quiet sides of town.

  11. Noelle Garrison

    I really loved this article! I wish more of the houses you talked about in the beginning would have been preserved instead of demolished. I thought it was really interesting how you described what things would have been like if they had been preserved, and the effect they would have had on the area where they were located. The Green Gables house is so gorgeous! I’m definitely hoping that house will be saved. What a shame it would be to just ruin and knock down such a beautiful piece of history. I absolutely love old buildings, seeing them and learning about them. This article was definitely one of my favorites so far

  12. Michelle Musick

    I love these older homes, especially the Queen Anne style homes, they are my favorite. I am always so sad when I see older homes that are dilapidated and falling to the ground, and wonder how beautiful they must have been back in their glory days, with a full mixed family hustling and bustling to help each other with their daily living. I also always wondered why they had such big houses and when I got older and found out that it was because they had several generations of family living under the same roof. And I guess that it took the whole family to make any type of decent living and have a decent life. Where as of today, most homes are single family homes with the siblings and each generation going there separate ways, but with hard economic times, once single family homes on their own are finding it difficult to support themselves and they are moving back in with other family members. I find that these larger family homes should act as a reminder of how far as a society we have came and that we should appreciate there glory that they represent. One day when I’m fully self sufficient and able to I am going to buy an older Queen Anne style home that is in need of being saved and remodel it, keeping in style of course, and giving it all the modern day necessities needed so that me and my family will be comfortable and I can have the satisfaction of knowing that I did my part in preserving a piece of our cultural history.

  13. Brad Hoe

    I agree with the statement by Paul Goldberger that, “Architecture’s the only one that’s around us all the time every day, and that does it’s magic on us every day.” The influence that architecture has on us is often lost in the constant bombardment of outside stimuli that we experience every day. It takes the passion and dedication of groups like the Melbourne Historical Society to show us that architecture specifically, historic architecture, has a tremendous influence on the character of a community. Before reading this post I was unaware of the historic buildings throughout Melbourne that have been lost over the years. However, due to the loss of these building the Melbourne Historical Society was born and they look to make sure that prominent historic structures are preserved. Recently, the Historical Society has been on focused on preserving The Green Gables, the historic home industrialist William T. Wells. Being a student in the interior design program at EFSC I was encouraged to visit The Green Gables along with members of the Melbourne Historical Society. To be honest I had no idea what The Green Gables was let alone it’s historical value to the community. However, after visiting the site and learning about the history the building I understood why the Melbourne Historical Society wanted to preserve The Green Gables. At the time of my visit The Green Gables was in danger of being lost since the owners were looking to sell the property. Yet, with the help of an article in the Florida Today, there has been an outpouring of community support for The Green Gables and the owners have held off selling the property. If the funds can be raised it looks like The Green Gables will be around for years to come.

  14. Elizabeth Kiser

    I think that you are right in stating that the city should have preserved these pieces of history for Melbourne. The Carleton hotel and the Miguel’s Restaurant are just some of the historic pieces that we have let slip away. In a good way though, because Miguel’s was lost, the historic preservation board was created to block historic buildings from being demolished or forgotten about.
    It is a shame that anyone would consider demolishing the Green Gables Estate. Unfortunately, this is where the preservationists have the most difficult time. According to an article in the Florida Today, a permit was applied for to demolish the house. The city cannot block the demolition because the house is “not in a historic district and does not have a local historic designation” (www.floridatoday.com/story/news/local/2014/06/15/green-gable). This would require that the owners of Green Gables request that the building be added to the historic list. I feel that the Green Gables Estate is going to be demolished because the owners don’t want to preserve history, or a building that is in bad shape.
    I hope that the Green Gables Estate is saved and that the owners see what a beautiful house they could have if they just added some TLC to it. The house even now, with the condition that it is in, is still beautiful. If this house has the unfortunate mishap as to be hit with a wrecking ball, I hope that in the future, the city can block future demolitions of historic property.

  15. Antwan Mingo

    In our class on historic preservation, we learned recently that rehabilitation of existing buildings usually makes better economic sense than new construction. Yet we are also learning of the frequent demolition of historic structures, either for new construction or just to leave a vacant lot. A CVS Pharmacy Store was built in 2003 where Doc Sloan’s House was demolished. Why? Why wasn’t the Carleton Hotel worth rebuilding, even if only to museum standards and not reopened for business? Is there NO ONE willing to purchase the Green Gables house and help the community restore it? So many questions!
    I was interesting in the story of the Green Gables house, and I did some research on Queen Anne styles in Florida. There are only two Queen Anne architectural landmarks in Florida listed in the National Register of Historic Places: the Belleview-Biltmore Hotel in Belleaire (near Clearwater Bay), and the A.C. Freeman house (or Gilchrist House) in Punta Gorda. I learned that having this designation does not prevent the demolition of a structure. In 2013 the current owners of the 117 year old hotel, built by railroad tycoon Henry B. Plant, published a plan to demolish the hotel and replace it with 32 townhomes and 136 condominiums in an architectural style reflecting the original hotel. Again, why?! It is a landmark and has been in various states of rehabilitation for almost 10 years! Why tear it down just to build new structures that “look like the old ones?”
    I’m sure there are a lot of tough decisions to be made when dealing with these social dilemmas, but it sure is sad to see the outcome of most of these local landmarks.

  16. Jennifer Scites

    I really enjoyed reading this article, especially since I was not able to attend the Green Gables event. This article gave me an opportunity to learn more about it and about other Historic Structures I didn’t know much about. I really love these older type homes, and feel historic buildings are a huge part of their community in which they are located. It’s unfortunate to see some of the older homes dilapidated and sitting empty. I remember as a kid driving to my grandparent’s farm in GA and passing many of these type homes that were just worn down and often times empty. You could tell that earlier in the houses life, they were just stunning. It was sad to see them so worn down. I wish the county would have chosen to preserve them to their original beauty, instead of just letting them sit. It’s amazing to me how many historic structures and buildings we have here, right in Brevard County. Riverview Village is a really unique neighborhood in itself. It’s beautiful to drive down and see the older style houses and its overhanging trees. I actually had the opportunity a few years ago to see the inside of one of these houses because my friend lived in one. It was simply beautiful and had its own style. He no longer lives there but I was fortunate for the opportunity. I would love to one day possibly own a house like this and add my own flare to the space. Perhaps in the near future more people will step up and realize how important preserving Historical Structures is. It saddens me to think what future generations will not be able to enjoy and learn about, if we do not.

  17. Veronica Tarducci

    This was such a great article regarding some of Melbourne’s lost historic buildings. I can recall passing Miguel’s many times when I was younger and admiring the beautiful architecture, so it was interesting to learn that the demolition of the building was what initiated the Melbourne Historic Preservation Board. Although I am sure that Melbourne lost many great buildings before the Board was formed, I imagine that much of Historic Melbourne might not still be here had the board not been started at all. As an interior design student at Eastern Florida State, I had attended Green Gables in the attempt to have the house preserved. Somehow, I didn’t even know that the building existed before attending that day, so it was very interesting to learn about the history of the house itself, as well as the impact that its owner (John Daly) had on the city that I grew up in. I definitely think that the home is worth saving, and I agree with the point made pertaining to its potential to transform the otherwise industrial area into a more historical dominant one. It is sad that the building has sat hidden for as long as it has, but given the extensive damages to it, such as hurricane damage from several past storms, I can understand why it might sound more reasonable to tear it down to some city citizens. As far as I understand, the building was set to be demolished after all attempts to restore it to its original look, but I hope that all hope is not lost yet for this beautiful home in Historic Melbourne.

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